“Do You Have Any Questions?” Ask These 11 Impressive Questions To Ask At The End Of Every Job Interview

10. How would your co-workers describe your management style?

“It’s important to ask about your potential manager’s leadership style but not just what they think about themselves. Asking what their peers and direct reports would say of their management style is key ― even better if they’re open to you talking to one of their direct reports about their leadership. A manager can make or break a job, so getting more context around the people you’ll be working with most closely will help in decision making.” ― Julia Missaggia, human resources director at CMI/Compas

11. Can you show me around before we wrap up?

“This question allows applicants to differentiate themselves at the end of their interviews by creating a unique experience with the interviewer that won’t be shared among other candidates. In fact, I can still recall my interview many years back with a candidate who asked me this very question. It breaks hiring managers out of their routines and forces them to leave the interview room and interact more naturally with the candidate.” ― Peter Yang, co-founder of ResumeGo

A few more tips to nail your interview:

Stick to open-ended questions. Even though job interviews can feel like interrogations, they’re supposed to be conversations between you and the interviewer. To keep the conversation flowing, avoid questions that can be answered with a simple “yes” or “no.”

Don’t ask questions with obvious answers. You shouldn’t ask questions just for the sake of asking; interviewers will see right through you. Do your research ahead of time and avoid asking for basic information that could easily be found on the company website.

Be respectful of everyone’s time. The interviewer likely has many other job interviews to conduct on top of meetings and regular job duties. Pick two or three important questions to ask rather than barraging them with all 11. Even better, try to weave in your questions throughout the conversation instead of waiting until the end of the interview.

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