“Do You Have Any Questions?” Ask These 11 Impressive Questions To Ask At The End Of Every Job Interview

2. What are the biggest challenges faced by your company/department today?

“I like asking this question to get a real sense of what they feel is most needed in their business. It could be a specific skill, improved processes or just additional resources to handle workload. Answers to this question will help you understand what your job will entail and give you the opportunity to explain how you could tackle your employer’s biggest challenge. On the other hand, if their biggest struggle doesn’t match your skills or expectations, it could be a useful red flag before accepting a new job.” ― Daniel Buchuk, director of communications at Bringg

3. What makes you different from your competitors?

When I applied for my current job, I asked questions about the company’s competitors and how they differentiated themselves. This is a good question to ask because companies want to see that you are diligent enough to do your homework in advance of the meeting and have a genuine interest in the field you are moving into.” ― Casey Hill, blogger at Musings of Entrepreneurship

4. Can you give me an example of how you live out the company values?

“I like to find out what values the company promotes on their career page — passion, integrity, accountability, etc. — and I’ll ask the interviewer how they live one or more of those values, especially as a manager. If the interviewer is dumbfounded, it typically shows that the values are nothing more than empty messaging. If they can answer the question, it shows the company believes in and instills its values in employees and the interviewer is probably a thoughtful manager.” ― Jennifer Bewley of Get Uncuffed

5. What is your training program like?

“I have found that reputable companies will answer this question by saying that the training period is as long as a new employee needs. Training that is rushed or fast-tracked to meet a quota or deadline isn’t an effective way to find reputable and reliable employees. Any new job comes with a learning curve; a good company will offer thorough training and help employees to obtain all the skills they need to be successful in the company.” ― Carlee Linden, writer for Best Company

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